Tag Archives: handwriting recognition

bett_show_2016

Noting the Future of Music with Digital Ink (Bett Show 2016 Preview)

Published: 18th January 2016

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This week, MyScript will demonstrate solutions for Education technology OEMs, developers, content and service providers at Bett Show in London (stand B87). Bett Show is the world’s largest education technology event and attracts over 35,000 visitors.

At Bett Show, MyScript will demonstrate how its interactive digital ink capabilities transcend handwritten text recognition to encompass equations, shapes, diagrams, musical notation, and other natural handwritten input. Never before has digital ink been this versatile and powerful. MyScript will demonstrate how this next generation technology can enhance the education experience for students and teachers.

In stand B87, MyScript will also feature a partner demonstration by PreSonus® Notion® for iOS, an app that takes music creation and education to the next level. Thanks to the integration of MyScript technology, iPad users can write music with a finger or stylus and see it effortlessly convert to digital notation.

notion

Using an Apple Pencil on the iPad Pro, users can write with pressure and thickness, which provides a more natural feeling and even greater accuracy. Up to 100+ music elements such as notes, clefs, bars, chords, time signatures, and more can be written and recognized. 

To learn more about Notion’s partnership with MyScript and the impact digital ink has on the future of music, we spoke with Chris Swaffer, Product Manager, Notion at PreSonus Audio Electronics.

Can you tell us a little bit about the story behind PreSonus and  the Notion composition app in particular?

Notion combines notation, sequencing, and live performance tools into one creative environment. Its sound library was recorded in London at the famous Abbey Road studios with the London Symphony Orchestra, and since then, we’ve released five major desktop versions for Mac and Windows.

In 2011, we launched Notion for iPad and added iPhone support in 2015. In 2013, Notion was acquired by PreSonus Audio Electronics, a leading manufacturer of recording and live-sound software and hardware, and we are now part of the team that creates the award winning DAW, Studio One. We’ve been featured by Apple in a number of their iPad campaigns, whether in store or as part of the 2014 YourVerse TV campaign for the iPad Air, and most recently as an “Amazing App for iPad Pro” in the App Store. Notion has been widely adopted by professionals, amateur musicians, and schools.  In fact, Notion was recently nominated for “Best Music Education Product” by the 2016 UK Music Teacher Awards.

Why did you choose to incorporate MyScript technology into the Notion app?

We chose MyScript because we wanted to avoid requiring a learning curve for the user. Other solutions require having to ‘teach’ the software your own handwriting, or having to learn a series of custom gestures. With MyScript, that all has been done and it comes built in – the user just writes music, however they want and however poor their handwriting is (to a point!).

What are some of the benefits of working with MyScript technology from a business standpoint (i.e. ease of use, cost effectiveness, etc.)?

On the business side, we needed a flexible partner that could take the time to understand our particular (and often peculiar!) market and come up with an appropriate solution. MyScript took the time to understand us and our requirements and our vision of how handwriting could be used in our products. It was also important to us that MyScript was an established and leading provider of recognition solutions, so we can rely on their support going forward as we continue to develop Notion. We are really thrilled to be a partner of MyScript at this year’s Bett Show and look forward to seeing teachers getting truly “hands-on” with Notion for iPad!

Several studies have shown that students better retain information through handwritten notes as opposed to typing. Do you think music students better understand what they’re learning by writing composition, as opposed to typing it digitally?

It’s crucial in composition to think about the sound you want and how it should be played when you’re writing a note – to some extent, Notion already encouraged this more than other score-writers with its responsive sounds. However, the act of handwriting engages other tactile areas of the brain that really helps this connection and aids creativity. Of course, handwriting is slower than digital or MIDI input – we invented notation software for a good reason! But Notion now has a solution that combines the convenience of digital notation with the elegance and feel of handwriting. This is especially true when using Notion on the iPad Pro with the Apple Pencil. Even though ultimately the actual handwriting is converted to digital notation, having the variable thickness of the lines through the pressure of the pencil as you draw really makes for a haptic and satisfying creative experience.

Learn more

At Bett Show, be sure to visit stand B87 to learn about MyScript solutions for education and for a hands-on Notion demonstration.

Leveraging MyScript Music, developers can create powerful music composition and notation programs, education software, games, or enhance their existing applications for inputting, editing and printing music. Click here to learn more.

Author: MyScript | Categories: Blog | Tags: , , , , , , ,
yo

Watch This Space: If You Think You Know What a Word is, Read on

Published: 18th August 2015

yoGuest blog post by Yo Sato, Natural Language Processing Engineer at MyScript 

 

 

InthisarticleI’mgoingtotalkabouttheissuesforhandwritingrecognitionrelatedtothespacesyoufindinwrittensentences.

You may think you’ve already got the point: ‘Okay so you’re telling me how important spaces are for smooth reading, since otherwise you wouldn’t know where one word ends and another starts. Well, no, that’s *not* the point I’ll be making, it’s almost the reverse. I ask: why are spaces felt necessary, which do not really exist in reality? Think about it. There is nothing a space represents in real speech. It does not represent a pause. We, simply, do, not, talk, like, this, butjusttalklikethis. So here’s the paradox: why would one need something to separate words only in writing, while being, in speech, entirely happy without?

The existence of languages that dispense with spaces altogether -let’s call them ‘glued’ languages as opposed to ‘spaced’ ones like English-is another testimony to the fact that spaces are not a universal requirement. So another question is: why, then, are they felt indispensable in spaced languages, while glued language speakers are perfectly happy without?

These are, as I see them, pretty deep questions, but at least there is one straightforward, if partial, answer. When talking about language, people tend to first talk about its smallest sound units (like vowels and consonants) and then about words and sentences, but there is something in between: syllables.  As far as I know, the written unit (characters) of glued languages —say Chinese or Japanese— is always a syllable, and it is this property that renders spaces unnecessary. Let’s now experiment with our English sentence:

In-this-ar-ti-kul-eyem-go-ing-too-tor-ka-bout-the-i-shooz-for-hand-ray-ting-re-cog-ni-shun-ri-lay-tid-too-spey-sees-yoo-find-in-ri-ten-sen-ten-sees.

Hope it’s better? So, syllable boundaries perhaps suffice for reading. In fact we have a ‘very-much spaced’ language at the other end of the spectrum, in which *all* syllable boundaries are spaced: Vietnamese. Here the word boundaries are obscured in a totally different sense. You don’t really know which spaces do, and do not, separate words.

Now that we’ve seen two extremes in space-taking —glued and very-much-spaced varieties, you might have imagined all sorts of possibilities in between. Sure enough, you do get them, and Korean is one. Its orthography is syllable-based, so you don’t strictly need spaces, but didn’t you find the ‘all-syllable’ writing as above still quite a bit awkward to read? So, Koreans have decided to introduce –surprise, surprise– spaces! Voila the birth of a semi-spaced language.

The big problem here is, ‘where’. Between words, or maybe phrases? But where are they! You’re in the sea of syllables, like the all-syllable sequence of English above, and are asked to put spaces ‘to ease up reading’. You could perhaps see there’s a lot of freedom in how you can slice it up, and this ‘freedom’ —or chaos, depending on how you look at it— is what has in fact ensued. Some people like to have more spaces than others. It’s a bit of the rule of the wild.

This has been a big problem for us, the developer of handwriting recognizer. A simple set of rules do not work, or rather, would annoy the user: we are fully aware that nothing is more annoying than the computer trying to be clever and overcorrecting you. Like any rule of the wild, however, this problem is not a complete chaos. There are regularities, and in some places, people are more likely to put a space, while in others, less likely to do so. Taking advantage of these patterns, we have been addressing the issue statistically, to better predict where spaces are intended by the writer. Our recent releases of Korean recognizer incorporate such improvements, although the process is gradual and more improvements are forthcoming.

To me, the ‘deeper’ issue in this whole space saga is the fuzziness of the notion of ‘word’, which the writers of a spaced language may just take for granted. For them, perhaps, it is simply a blob of ink surrounded by spaces. And this notion of ‘word’ (chicken-and-egg anyhow, because the spacing relies on it) is not so solid either. Is “I’m” a word, or perhaps two? What about “handwriting”, maybe you’re also happy with “hand writing”? Even “going to”, which is pronounced “gonna” in casual speech, could be considered a single word maybe? There are languages where “I’m going to talk” is represented as a ‘word’ after all!

What people care most about in language is meaning, but as long as meaning is clear, they may opt for various ‘spacing’ arrangements. Very likely, a completely glued language like Chinese has developed as such thanks to the meaning ‘support’ coming from characters themselves (ideographs). To a large degree however, how a language uses spaces is a result of historical accidents. While there definitely is something like word (meaning unit), to pinpoint what it is, and where it is, is a rather tricky question.

So, you still think you know what a word is?

Yo Sato is a Natural Language Processing Engineer at MyScript. After obtaining a Ph.D. from King’s College London, U.K., (computational linguistics), he joined MyScript in 2012 and is responsible for developing ‘language models’, a backbone of handwriting recogniser, of various languages, with an inevitable attachment to his native language Japanese.

Lifestyle-iPad21

MyScript Calculator 1.3 for iOS: Users Spoke, MyScript Listened

Published: 19th March 2015

Lifestyle iPad

MyScript Calculator is back and better than ever! The CES Mobile App Showdown winner has just launched a new 1.3 version for iOS devices. Our development team heard users’ suggestions and incorporated multiple new features into this fan favorite, which automatically transforms handwritten equations into solutions.

While pondering the idea of adding in-app features, we looked at our users’ top requested features. Lots of users requested to be able to see and use their previous calculations, so we thought of how to make this simple and fun to use.

  • Immediate reuse: Drag and drop the result across the canvas to reuse it in the next calculation. When you reuse a result, the current calculation fades out so you can start a fresh one. 
  • Memory: Save an unlimited number of values in memory by simply dragging and dropping the result into the top bar. You can insert them anywhere on the canvas using drag and drop as well. 
  • History: All your past calculations are saved. You can browse through the history, reload a calculation in the canvas and export one or multiple items to other apps. 
  • Copy as text: Results and memory items can be copied to the clipboard by tapping them.

 

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These features make the app even more convenient for users to quickly find the solution to a math problem and apply it to the next one. Or better yet, they can use the answer in other apps or a web browser. For instance, once you’ve solved your calculation, you can paste your results as text into an email, online form or even your notebook for later reference.

To check out MyScript Calculator and receive your 30 free trials with the premium features, go here.

Note to developers:  MyScript Calculator is the latest in handwriting recognition math apps to leverage MyScript’s Math Widget available on the Developer Program web site. The widget lets developers easily include handwritten math input with ultimate accuracy, supporting operators such as:

  • Basic operations: +, -, ×, ÷, /
  • Powers, roots, exponentials: 7², √, ∛, e³
  • Misc. operations: %, |5|, 3!
  • Brackets: ( )
  • Trigonometry: cos, sin, tan, cot, cosh, sinh, tanh
  • Inverse trigonometry: acos, asin, atan
  • Logarithms: ln, log
  • Constants: π, e, phi

 
Click here to learn more about our tools for developers.

Author: MyScript | Categories: Blog | Tags: , , , , , , ,
Women writing on smart tablet .technology

National Handwriting Day – Celebrate The MyScript Way

Published: 23rd January 2015

In honor of National Handwriting Day, we’d like to take a moment to appreciate how handwriting impacts our lives every day. From nostalgic love notes to crossing things off your to-do list, there is just something about writing by hand that can’t be replaced. Until now.

MyScript has given handwriting a digital makeover. Through our own technology showcase apps and partnerships with developers, we give users the best of both worlds. Writing by hand on a tablet or mobile device mimics the brain activity triggered by traditional pen and paper handwriting, while also allowing users to organize their content in an interactive and dynamic digital form.

Here are a few ways MyScript is keeping the love of beautiful penmanship and convenience of note taking alive on National Handwriting Day and throughout the year.

Reflect On The Year Ahead

Each year, we all create New Year’s resolutions and each year, we let them slip away from us. This year, keep your resolutions alive using our Smart Note app for iOS and Android, which turns handwritten goals into digital content that you can reference all year long. Write your goals down, share them on social, or just keep them in your notes on your mobile device so you can check back in with them as often as you’d like.

Crunch Numbers In A Flash

In a hurry and need the answer to a math problem? How about trying to figure out the final cost of clothes during a 40 percent off sale at the store? Using MyScript Calculator for iOS or Android, users can jot down a math equation right on their mobile device and have the app fill in the rest. It works for basic operations, powers, roots, logarithms and even trigonometry.

Send A Love Note

Valentine’s Day is just around the corner, and nothing is more thoughtful than a handwritten note showing your loved one that you care. Instead of a paper card or sticky note that might be thrown away, share a note with them using MyScript Smart Note so they can save your digital Valentine to their mobile device. This way, they can look back at it whenever they feel like it.

Ditch The Keyboard And Use Handwriting In Any iOS App 

With MyScript Stack for iOS, you can use handwriting as a way to enter information in almost any app. Using superimposed input (also known as overwriting) , this innovative natural input panel allows you to continuously and quickly write characters on top of each other, making short text entry convenient and efficient. With MyScript Stack, you can easily input phone numbers, look up names in address books, compose tweets, and write chat or SMS messages with your fingertips. The handwritten input is instantly recognized and converted to digital text.

Get Some Family Time In

Between work, practice and school, it can be difficult to find one-on-one time with your kids. Why not combine study time with family time? With one of our many partners’ math, writing or shapes apps (using MyScript HWR technology), you can help your children practice their writing or math studies right on your mobile device. They’re brightly colored and entertaining for you and your kids!

While National Handwriting Day is just once a year, enjoy the feeling of writing on your digital devices year round with MyScript. Check out this video to discover the possibilities of handwriting.

We want to know – what other ways do you like to use MyScript and our partner apps throughout the year?

Note to developers: We have tools available that will help  you harness the power of handwriting for your applications. Click here to learn more.

 

Woman looking at wearable fitness device

Internet of Things: Wearables Are Set to Take Over

Published: 14th January 2015

Wearable technology is in such high demand that it is now a marketplace option at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) and most high tech publications that covered the event included “wearable tech” as its own coverage category.  People want to know what latest gadget they can buy, what it does, how it’s relevant and what impact it will have on their daily lives.

All of this makes sense since CCS Insight estimated 35 million wearables were in use by the end of 2014.  Cameras, clothes, glasses, sports trackers, watches, you name it. Projecting even further out, global retail revenue from IoT-enabled devices is expected to triple in volume by 2016 and eventually reach $53.2 billion in sales by 2019.

This surge in popularity comes as consumers want to track everything from calories to steps to gas mileage in their cars. But what will it take to reach the tipping point for IoT-based wearable tech?

Advice to Developers 

Developers looking to get into the connected wearable tech market have to keep it simple. It can’t disrupt consumers’ regular way of doing things, but instead just digitize everyday tasks they’re already doing. Offering a shallow learning curve ensures consumers will see a payoff well worth the effort.

For instance, the original design of wearable fitness trackers was a simple wrist device. Consumers could put it on and continue about their business as usual then, at the end of the day, have data about their exerted exercise. The key – the solution was simple. That transitioned into today’s more sophisticated smartwatch, which monitors multiple aspects of the body, includes connectivity and allows consumers to store data in the cloud.

The same goes for businesses. From police cameras to manufacturer’s eyewear, organizations are testing out connected wearable devices to improve worker safety, reduce mistakes and cut costs. But for the tech to take off, it can’t take tons of training or take away from doing the actual job at hand. One wearable that’s seen success in commercial use is eyewear. It can identify information about a particular task and automatically provide a user manual. With this functionality, workers can simply walk up to and operate equipment because the information is right there in their glasses.

Moving Beyond Fitness and Eyewear

So now the question is, how do manufacturers and developers keep the momentum going? By opening up. Leveraging open source solutions like open APIs, and sharing information such as free or discounted software development kits, developers can support the growth of IoT-based wearable tech.  Over the last two years, nearly 11,000 open APIs have been published for developers to take advantage of.

These tools not only enable developers to build and learn much more quickly but also make it easier for disparate devices to connect with each other. Smart light bulbs, weather stations, fitness trackers and more can all connect to mobile apps to create an entire picture instead of fragmented perspectives.

Additional Resources

Be sure to check out the new white paper The Internet of Me: How Wearable Tech is Changing the Internet of Things from the Application Developers Alliance. This white paper is the latest in a series of documents designed to help developers understand the many facets of the Internet of Things.  MyScript is proud to participate in this series as a member of the Alliance’s Emerging Technologies Working Group.

Also watch this video interview (live from CES) with Paddy Padmanabhan, CEO of MyScript, discussing the potential for handwriting recognition technology in wearable applications and beyond. MyScript’s technology is already leveraged in cars, kids’ apps, field service data capture forms, and much more. For more information about leveraging MyScript developer tools in the IoT, click here to visit our Developer Program web site. 

 

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Developer Success Story: MetaMoJi Provides A Global Input Option

Published: 8th January 2015

Consumers of all nationalities, ages, demographics and languages want to upgrade their standard feature cell phones for smartphones. So much so that Gartner predicts that the high-tech devices will make up 90 percent of the global market by 2018.

As consumers in non-Western markets like those in Southeast Asia and the Middle East continue to choose smartphones over feature phones, phone manufacturers and developers will need to incorporate technology that adapts to new markets’ input preferences. For example, typing Mandarin Chinese or Japanese kanji on a regular keyboard can be very tedious because for each phonetic spelling there are multiple words or characters, leaving you to wonder if the standard Western keyboard is really the best global input option.

A Success Story

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Whether writing in English, Japanese or Hindi in Devanagari script, it’s important that your mobile device can easily capture and translate the language accurately. This was the ultimate goal of MetaMoJi founders Kazunori and Hatsuko Ukigawa: to transform computer interaction into a more natural experience that goes beyond the traditional QWERTY keyboard while also providing a smooth experience– regardless of the operating systems, formats or languages.

Fully qualified to tackle this task, both founders had more than 30 years’ experience in computer programming and had already developed the first complete keyboard-based word processing system that was compatible with kanji for PCs. With such strong resumes, in 2009 Mr. and Mrs. Ukigawa took on their next challenge by founding MetaMoJi, a company that focuses on stroke-based business productivity for touchscreen devices for users across Asia and the world.

During the development, MetaMoJi sought out handwriting recognition technology from vendors around the world. After vetting several companies, they ultimately chose MyScript because of our industry-leading accuracy and our shared dedication to international communities. It was invaluable that our technology supports nearly 100 languages.

MetaMoJi is committed to breaking down barriers between devices and users by turning mobile devices into “smart paper” with its apps: 7Notes, MetaMoJi Note and the Su-Pen Stylus. Today, MetaMoJi’s apps offer the comfort of an analog experience combined with the convenience of digital technology that can be e-mailed, printed, archived or shared – in real time. Click here to learn more about MetaMoJi apps.

Use Case

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Before the iPad, retailers recorded all customer data manually by pen and paper, but with the help of MetaMoJi and MyScript’s HWR technology, they’re able to capture customer information on-site. For instance, ABC Cooking Studio, a cooking school in Japan that has more than 20,000 new registrations per month, is a great example of the impact digital handwriting can have on a business. By implementing MetaMoJi’s mazec on iPads in ABC Cooking Studio locations, they have saved around 20-30 minutes of paperwork per person. What took up to 90 minutes on a busy Saturday or Sunday, now takes just a fraction of the time. That’s astounding!

Not only are customers happier because they can write like they would on any registration form, but the cooking studio is also running more smoothly overall. They’re able to eliminate wasted paper and time on clerical work while maintaining up-to-date records of students. Most importantly, the new registration method enabled teachers to focus on their core job, providing amazing cooking instruction to their students.

This is just one way MetaMoJi, leveraging MyScript’s HWR technology, has helped elevate customers’ experiences in Japan. But this solution applies to any business, in any country that is still offering its customers an old, analog experience. Allowing customers to use their native language and intuitive input method on an iPad saves time, paper, as well as the risk of scaring off customers with a long registration process.

Note to developers: Interested in developing your own application or solution using MyScript technology? Click here to learn more about our Developer Program.

Rise-MyScript-Infographic-v2

The Future Has Always Been In Your Hands (Infographic)

Published: 29th December 2014

Since the beginning of time, communication has been about expressing your thoughts, stories and ideas with others. Adapting to new cultures and technologies, it went from pictographs on a cave wall to today’s digital writing on a touchscreen.

While the fundamental tools have always been the same – our hands – the methods have continued to evolve. Initially, we leveraged pictures etched into clay, but that gave way to writing sounds and syllables through newly formed alphabets. From stone to papyrus to paper, reed brushes to quills, typewriters to keyboards, handwriting has evolved to today’s digital technology form.

When a new writing technology develops, we tend to look at those of the past with great nostalgia. For instance as we’ve given in to the immediacy and convenience of connecting online via email and instant message, some argue that we’ve lost our emotional connection because of the keyboard. We romanticize the days of grandma’s recipes on index cards or a handwritten love letter.

But now we don’t have to choose. As with the Sumerians’ soft clay tablets carved with a stylus, we have the capability to leverage a digital stylus on today’s tablets. This advanced handwriting recognition technology combines the intimacy of our individual handwritten personality with the convenience of the connected device. This combination allows us to put our thoughts down on paper seamlessly, nostalgically and have them stored in the cloud for searching later.

That convenience will likely drive many of the future transformations in digital handwriting. The number of devices that leverage handwriting recognition technology like tablets, phones, cars, and other devices in the Internet of Things (smart watches, etc) is already increasing every year, making it even easier to sync and share your communications with others. So while the method of execution has changed from chisel to digital pen and touch, we’ll always be able to count on the original tools – our hands.

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MyScript Smart Note Solves Penultimate Users’ Woes

Published: 5th December 2014

What’s more important – delivering useful features to today’s customers or building tools for those that may exist later on? In a recent blog post, Evernote admitted to releasing their latest update to Penultimate too soon and to missing the mark on user expectations.

For a note-taking app, that’s simple UI, ability to easily find and share notes, and integration with other functions such as email and browsing. These are ideals we keep at our core for MyScript Smart Note as we ensure our users can easily use our app for daily notes, work, studying, drawing, etc.

Take the natural flow of handwriting for example. With MyScript Smart Note on iOS, we enable a scrolling input that also allows you to see the full text simultaneously, just as you would when writing on paper or typing on a mobile device. While this may seem specific, imagine writing without being able to see what you just wrote a few seconds ago and having to toggle back to a view screen. This can sometimes be the case with people who write largely. Our input lens allows you to write in your natural size, while the output displays smaller to fill the page with more content.

Functionality is another important aspect of any app in the note-taking space. Search is a key feature for MyScript Smart Note, which allows a breadth of functionalities to make your note taking interactive and seamless. It’s easy to search for any word or phrase within your notes, whether it’s hundreds or just a few. Once you’ve found the note you were searching for, you can share it with friends via social media, email clients, Dropbox, and Evernote. Not to mention you can also find definitions online from within MyScript Smart Note while searching for a word.

Accuracy is also a critical user requirement. MyScript has developed the most advanced handwriting recognition software in the world. MyScript Smart Note gives users the power to convert even handwritten jots into digital text which can be sent as a note to a friend in your contact list or pasted into other apps . MyScript Smart Note also has a unique math equations feature and is available in 54 languages.

All combined, this is what separates the most useful apps from all the others. While we agree with Evernote that redesigns are important, we always want to make sure our fundamental functionality remains a priority for our users. We believe keeping natural and interactive note-taking capabilities at the core of Smart Note is the best way to provide our users with the experience they want now and in the future. To download MyScript Smart Note for iOS, please go here and for Android, please go here.

Note to developers: A Smart Note Taking Toolkit is available for developers to leverage the core technology showcased in the MyScript Smart Note application. To learn more, visit the Developer Program web site or feel free to contact us

MyScript Featured in Application Developers Alliance White Paper “Automotive as a Microcosm of IoT”

Published: 29th October 2014

The Application Developers Alliance and its Emerging Technology Working Group recently released a white paper on Automotive as part of a broader series around the Internet of Things (iOT). This white paper explores the current state of Automotive in the iOT, best practices for creating apps, and new opportunities to explore in the space.

According to the paper, industry experts estimate that every car will be connected in some way by 2025, and the market for connected vehicle technology will reach $54 billion by 2017. With tremendous opportunity for automotive innovation, the industry is calling on developers to get involved.

This white paper interviewed influencers (including MyScript) in the automotive space to explore:

  • The current state and future of in-vehicle development.
  • Consumer expectations as well as the challenges and opportunities for development.
  • Best practices, tools, and resources for creating quality in-vehicle apps.

 

Dr. Pierre Laporte, Executive Vice-President, Engineering at MyScript was interviewed as part of the white paper development and is featured in the paper. Click here to read and download the paper.

Today’s drivers expect a great deal from their vehicles, including the kind of advanced technology and innovative features they enjoy in the home and workplace. MyScript helps manufacturers and aftermarket vendors meet this voracious consumer demand.  As a pioneer in the field, MyScript offers a superior HMI experience by enabling control of in-vehicle systems through handwriting, a preferred input method for many drivers.

MyScript technology is utilized in the in-vehicle infotainment systems of leading automotive manufacturers and offers a natural human machine interface (HMI). With MyScript technology, drivers can interact with their vehicle consoles using handwriting and related gestures. Drivers can write characters or numerals, or simply gesture with their fingertips on a touchpad or screen to quickly and discreetly accomplish tasks such as selecting a destination, making a telephone call, or noting information. When vehicles are parked, drivers and passengers can use handwriting for more complex tasks such as capturing notes, browsing the internet, and searching media libraries. MyScript also supports integration with geographical databases for navigation systems and text-to-speech feedback for a unique multi-modal experience.

MyScript technology is based on natural handwritten input which allows an intuitive interface and a more positive user experience. Studies have shown that handwriting is an effective and safe way for drivers to interact with infotainment consoles with minimum driver distraction. Handwriting is also highly accurate and independent from the acoustic environment. MyScript technology is available for 97 languages, offering a global HMI experience.

Click here to read more about MyScript solutions for Automotive.

MyScript Featured in Application Developers Alliance White Paper "Automotive as a Microcosm of IoT"

Published: 29th October 2014

The Application Developers Alliance and its Emerging Technology Working Group recently released a white paper on Automotive as part of a broader series around the Internet of Things (iOT). This white paper explores the current state of Automotive in the iOT, best practices for creating apps, and new opportunities to explore in the space.

According to the paper, industry experts estimate that every car will be connected in some way by 2025, and the market for connected vehicle technology will reach $54 billion by 2017. With tremendous opportunity for automotive innovation, the industry is calling on developers to get involved.

This white paper interviewed influencers (including MyScript) in the automotive space to explore:

  • The current state and future of in-vehicle development.
  • Consumer expectations as well as the challenges and opportunities for development.
  • Best practices, tools, and resources for creating quality in-vehicle apps.

 

Dr. Pierre Laporte, Executive Vice-President, Engineering at MyScript was interviewed as part of the white paper development and is featured in the paper. Click here to read and download the paper.

Today’s drivers expect a great deal from their vehicles, including the kind of advanced technology and innovative features they enjoy in the home and workplace. MyScript helps manufacturers and aftermarket vendors meet this voracious consumer demand.  As a pioneer in the field, MyScript offers a superior HMI experience by enabling control of in-vehicle systems through handwriting, a preferred input method for many drivers.

MyScript technology is utilized in the in-vehicle infotainment systems of leading automotive manufacturers and offers a natural human machine interface (HMI). With MyScript technology, drivers can interact with their vehicle consoles using handwriting and related gestures. Drivers can write characters or numerals, or simply gesture with their fingertips on a touchpad or screen to quickly and discreetly accomplish tasks such as selecting a destination, making a telephone call, or noting information. When vehicles are parked, drivers and passengers can use handwriting for more complex tasks such as capturing notes, browsing the internet, and searching media libraries. MyScript also supports integration with geographical databases for navigation systems and text-to-speech feedback for a unique multi-modal experience.

MyScript technology is based on natural handwritten input which allows an intuitive interface and a more positive user experience. Studies have shown that handwriting is an effective and safe way for drivers to interact with infotainment consoles with minimum driver distraction. Handwriting is also highly accurate and independent from the acoustic environment. MyScript technology is available for 97 languages, offering a global HMI experience.

Click here to read more about MyScript solutions for Automotive.